Echo Dot (3rd Gen) - Smart speaker with Alexa - Charcoal

Use your voice to play a song, artist, or genre through Amazon Music, Apple Music, Spotify, Pandora, and others. With compatible Echo devices in different rooms, you can fill your whole home with music.

Buy Now

Wireless Rechargeable Battery Powered WiFi Camera.

Wireless Rechargeable Battery Powered WiFi Camera is home security camera system lets you listen in and talk back through the built in speaker and microphone that work directly through your iPhone or Android Mic.

Buy Now

Dog learns new tricks via vibrating vest

0
176


Tai and his haptic vestImage copyright
Jonathan Atari

Image caption

Commands sent via vibrations could be useful for disabled dog-owners or people involved in search and rescue

A dog called Tai is learning to respond to commands in a unique way, via vibrations in his vest.

Tai was raised to be a guide dog for a blind person but failed the test because he was easily distracted and preferred sniffing things.

Now reinvented as a remote-controlled canine, he responds better to vibrating commands than vocal ones.

The system he is testing could be useful in situations where a dog is not in the line of sight of its owner.

That includes military dogs and those employed on search-and-rescue missions. The vest could also be a new way for disabled people to communicate with an assistance dog.

The system was developed at Ben-Gurion University (BGU) in Israel and relies on a modified canine vest which contains four small vibrating motors positioned over the dog’s back and sides.

The dog is trained to respond to different vibrations sent via a wireless remote control.

Image copyright
Jonathan Atari

Image caption

Tai has been able to respond to a series of commands sent via the vest

So far, Tai, a six-year-old Labrador retriever/German shepherd crossbreed, has learned to respond to several commands, including “spin”, “down”, “to me” and “backpedal”.

“Our research results showed that dogs responded to these vibro-tactile cues as well or even better than vocal commands,” says Prof Amir Shapiro, director of the robotics laboratory within BGU’s department of mechanical engineering.

“Our current proof-of-concept study shows promising results that open the way toward the use of haptics for human-canine communication.”

Haptics describes technology that uses touch to control and interact with computers.

The paper describing the work was presented at the World Haptics Conference in Japan, earlier this month.

The next stage is to use different breeds and ages of dogs, as well as those at different stages of training. And the vests will also start getting more sophisticated.



Read More

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here